Tag Archives: Gluten-free diet

12Sep/15

So What Is Whole Food Anyway?

Who isn’t into health these days? If it is information that you are seeking then check out these whole food blogs for up to the minute health food advice.

The Healthy Home Economist is a must read blog that keeps the health conscience consumer aware about trendy new health drinks and much more. Just put your request into the search box and you will be rewarded with a plethora of articles on that particular subject. Punch in raw milk and you can learn from any of the 5 articles that come up. The Healthy Home Economist is featured in several well-known venues from Dr. Mercola’s Take Control of Your Health site to the New York Times.

The Healthy Green Kitchen is another blog not to be missed. Winnie Abramson is the developer and she talks about everything from recipes to e-books Abramson has it all.

The Whole New Mom’s Healthy Living is another great blog by a mother named Adrienne. All of her recipes are sugar free and mostly grain free. She also talks about personal care items which is more in demand these days. Adrienne even goes so far as to have a special tab for health concerns such as adrenal and thyroid. This is a very comprehensive blog which has something for every health conscious person’s needs.

Simply Sugar and Gluten-Free is another blog that health enthusiasts cannot miss. It is written by Amy Green. She shares her journey from being a fat child to becoming a healthy adult. Obviously she condemns sugar and gluten for her weight issues in her younger years. Amy offers decadent desserts that are sugar and gluten free, but taste amazingly delicious. She also talks about essential oils which have become the rage as of late.

The Food Renegade has a unique feature for a whole food blog. It lists a fairly comprehensive shopping guide that allows the consumer to locate quality vendors that offer whole foods and supplements.

101 cookbooks is another interesting whole food blog. This blog features a shop where you can purchase cooking ingredients and paraphernalia that might be needed to cook with. From pans to brushes to knives this site can save you time by offering everything anyone might need for their gourmet cooking needs. Another feature of this blog are the many genres of cookbooks offered. No matter if you’re looking for a certain ethnic cuisine or a healthy way to bake this blog offers it.

10Aug/15

FAQs About Gluten-Free Foods

There is a lot of buzz now about gluten-free foods. Many people are confused about what gluten is and why they should avoid it. Here are some frequently asked questions about gluten-free foods.

What is Gluten?

Gluten is a name for proteins that are found in cereal grains. This would include barley, rye, triticale and wheat. Gluten acts like glue in foods, helping to bind them together.

• Barley is found in beer, food coloring, malt, malt vinegar and soups
• Rye is found in cereals, rye beer and rye bread like pumpernickel
• Triticale is a cross between wheat and rye and is found in bread, cereals and pasta
• Wheat is found in baked goods, breads, cereals, pasta, roux, salad dressings, sauces and soups

What is a Gluten-free Diet?

A gluten-free diet consists of avoiding any food that contains gluten. This diet is difficult to follow and constitutes a big change. Fortunately, with the interest in gluten-free diets, many stores offer an array of gluten-free products. Foods allowed on the diet include fruits, vegetables, beans, nuts, seeds, eggs, meat, poultry, fish, and many dairy products.

Some grains and starchy foods that contain no gluten are: amaranth, arrowroot, beans, buckwheat groats (kasha),cassava, chia, corn, corn meal, flax, gluten-free oats, millet, potato, quinoa, rice, sorghum, soy, tapioca, teff and yucca. You can find various flours that are gluten-free such as bean, corn, nut, potato and rice flour.

What is the Rationale Behind Adoption of the Diet?

A gluten-free diet is prescribed for people who suffer from Celiac Disease. It is an autoimmune disorder where gluten causes inflammation in the small intestines. When gluten is eaten, the body overreacts and attacks the small intestine. This can damage the villi which absorb nutrients. This means the body cannot receive the nutrients well.

One percent of the general population has Celiac Disease. Some people are sensitive to gluten but do not have Celiac Disease. They have a non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Many of them will go gluten-free or at least lower the amount of gluten in their diet.

What are the Health Benefits of Gluten-free Eating for the General Population?

Going gluten-free may reduce the chance of inflammation in other parts of the body, so if someone has issues with their joints, not eating gluten may ease their symptoms. Some people say avoiding gluten can give you more energy. There has also been reported a change in autistic children when placed on a gluten free diet.